International symposium: Jazz Cosmopolitanism from East to West

Jul 21 2014

Chinese Flag
Jazz Cosmopolitanism from East to West is 3 day symposium hosted by Ningbo University College of Arts in partnership with the School of Arts & Media, University of Salford.

Date and Location
9-12 January 2015, Ningbo University College of Arts, Ningbo, China

Call for Papers

“Jazz is so much more than music: it is a lifestyle and a tool for dialogue, even social change. The history of jazz tells of the power of music to bring together artists from different cultures and backgrounds, as a driver of integration and mutual respect.” Irina Bokova, Director General, UNESCO

Jazz Cosmopolitanism from East to West will focus on jazz as both a national and transnational cultural practice, comparing the uses and representations of music in different international contexts in order to explore questions relating to the development, assimilation, appropriation, and exchange of culture. Jazz plays a complex role in the cultural and sub-cultural life of different international scenes and this event will examine ways in which jazz scholars, musicians and fans interpret and interact with the music, the ways in which jazz networks are constructed and established in various cultures, how music is translated, and serves as a driver for social and cultural change. Jazz Cosmopolitanism from East to West will investigate ways in which the music can challenge established stereotypical distinctions between national settings and regions, including concepts of East and West.
The organising committee welcomes proposals for presentations which focus specifically on the following themes:

• Jazz as a tool for social change and/or cultural understanding
• The relationship between jazz, national cultural values, and transnational influences
• Jazz in translation: the cultural meanings of jazz in different international settings
Challenging dominant representations of jazz as evidenced in the attitudes and practices of critics, musicians and audiences as well as representations in film, television and literature. This could include the exploration of established mythologies and stereotypes distinctions between East and West

Conference organisers
Professor Yu Hui (Ningbo University College of Arts)
Professor Tony Whyton (School of Arts & Media, University of Salford)

Deadline for proposals
12 September 2014

Proposals of c.300 words should be sent to Professors Yu Hui ([email protected]) and Tony Whyton ([email protected])

Languages
English / Chinese

Accommodation / Fees
There will be no conference fee but travel, accommodation and subsistence costs must be met by individual participants. The symposium host will provide a limited accommodation allowance and one-day free local sightseeing for international participants.

Ningbo City
Ningbo is a seaport city in the northeast of Zhejiang province, China,holding sub-provincial administrative status with a population of 7.6 million. It is one of China’s oldest cities, with a history dating to the Hemudu culture in 4800 BC. The city was known as a trade city on the silk road at least two thousand years ago, and then as a major port for foreign trade since the Tang Dynasty. It enjoys both historical culture atmosphere and the dynamic economic development of modern China.

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Congratulations to Dr Tom Sykes

Jul 18 2014

At the University of Salford graduation ceremony yesterday at The Lowry, Salford Quays, UK, Dr Tom Sykes, a PhD student on the original Rhythm Changes project, was awarded his PhD.  Tom’s thesis is entitled Jazz for the I-Pod Generation. Here he is receiving his award. Many congratulations, Dr Sykes. You can view the ceremony here.

Tom Sykes PhD 2014

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Profs Tony Whyton and George McKay win University of Salford research excellence award for Rhythm Changes project

Jun 21 2014

We’re delighted to announce that, at the annual University Day celebration this week, Profs Tony Whyton and George McKay won the University of Salford’s Vice-Chancellor’s Research Excellence Award for 2014. This was for the Rhythm Changes: European Jazz and National Identities research project (2010-13), that brilliantly stimulating and massively creative and fun three-year jazz jaunt, caravanserai, parade, around the New (Euro-)Jazz Studies, with partners from Graz, Amsterdam, Copenhagen, Birmingham, and Stavanger, musicians, artists, festivals, academics, archivists. Yes, that project was an absolute blast—and it’s still going of course, for we have the 3rd international Rhythm Changes conference, Beyond Jazz Borders, this September at Amsterdam Conservatory to look forward to.

It’s great to get such recognition from Salford, the university that led the project. Here’s what the Vice-Chancellor, Prof Martin Hall (left, in photo below) , had to say at University Day, which was attended by 400 colleagues from across the institution.

The University of Salford is nothing without its people. Everyone has a part to play in making the University … the vibrant, pioneering and, above all, warm and welcoming institution that it is. Without you, this University would be little more than bricks and mortar. It is you who bring these buildings to life with your passion, your endless enthusiasm, your dreams, your focus on our students, your curiosity, thirst for knowledge, the need to find answers and a desire to change lives.

VC Award Salford with Tony Whyton

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Carnivalising Pop: Music Festival Cultures symposium programme, Salford UK, 13 June 2014

Jun 06 2014

salford_logoHere is the finalised programme for the symposium, which includes jazz festivals and several contributions from the Rhythm Changes team. Further information, including directions and registration information, is here.

Friday 13 June 2014, The Old Fire Station, University of Salford

9:30 – 9:50           Arrival and Coffee

9:50 – 10:00        Welcome and introduction – Professor George McKay, University of Salford

10:00 – 10:45      Keynote 1           Dr Gina Arnold, Stanford University
Race, space, and representation at American rock festivals

10:45 – 12:15      Session 1             Aspects of and developments in festival culture

Dr Nicholas Gebhardt, Birmingham City University
Rock festivals of the transatlantic counterculture

Dr Anne Dvinge, University of Copenhagen
Musicking in Motor City: reconfiguring urban space at the Detroit Jazz Festival

Dr Roxanne Yeganegy, Leeds Metropolitan University
No Spectators! Burning Man, boutique festivals and the art of participation

12:15 – 1:00        Lunch   

Includes screening of short film, Carnivalising the Creative Economy: AHRC-funded Research on and with British Jazz Festivals (dir. Gemma Thorpe, 2014)

1:00 – 2:30           Session 2             Mediating, Performing and Technologising the Festival

Dr Mark Goodall, University of Bradford

Out of Sight: the mediation of the music festival
Dr Rebekka Kill, Leeds Metropolitan University
The artist at the music festival: visual art, performance and hybridity 

Dr Andrew Dubber, Birmingham City University
Music Technologism: innovation, collaboration and participation at the festival of music ideas

2:30 – 3:15           Keynote 2           Alan Lodge, veteran festivals photographer and travellers activist

Discussion and showing of some key photographs of festivals, New Travellers and alternative culture in Britain since the late 1970s

3:15 – 3:30           Coffee Break

3:30 – 4:15           Session 3             How to Make a Popular Music Festival

Ben Robinson, director, Kendal Calling festival

Danny Hagan, co-founder, Green Man festival

4:15 – 5:45           Session 4             From Festivals to Arenas

Professor Robert Kronenburg, University of Liverpool
From Shed to Venue: The Architecture of Popular Music Performance

Dr Emma Webster, Oxford Brookes University
The role of promoters at arena shows: a case study of Stereophonics at Glasgow’s SECC arena

Dr Ben Halligan, University of Salford
Skanky Shamanism: Sensual Audience Participation and the Miley Cyrus “Bangerz” Arena Tour

5:45 – 6:00pm    Close

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Downtown New York Jazz Symposium

May 15 2014

Downtown New York Jazz

Library of Birmingham, Heritage Learning Space

Thursday 5 June 2014

Free Entry

 

10:30am

Welcome

Ed McKeon (Director, Frontiers Festival)

11 am – 11:45 am

WIS (aka Warren Smith) in conversation with Rhys Chatham

12pm – 12:30pm

Professor Tim Wall (Birmingham City University)

“Jazz in Manhattan’s Lofts in the 1970s: David Murray, new jazz and its contribution to the founding of the Downtown Scene”

12:30pm – 1:30pm

Lunch (not provided)

1:30pm – 2pm

Dr. Kirsten Forkert (Birmingham City University)

“The Lower East Side and the politics of real estate”

2:15pm – 2:45pm

Tony Dudley-Evans (Jazzlines)

“Tim Berne: his role in the Downtown and Brooklyn scene.”

3pm – 3:30pm

Dr. Roger Fagge (University of Warwick)

”MacDougal Street Blues’: Jack Kerouac and Jazz Performance’.

3:45pm – 4:15pm

Dr. Nicholas Gebhardt (Birmingham City University)

“Friends and Neighbors: living with jazz”

4:30pm

Close

This event is supported by the Library of Birmingham, Birmingham Conservatoire and the Birmingham Centre for Media and Cultural Research. It forms part of the Frontiers Festival: Extraordinary Music from Downtown New York & Birmingham www.frontiersmusic.org

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Cheltenham Jazz Festival AHRC talks

Apr 29 2014

Cheltenham JF 2014 strapThe Arts & Humanities Research Council (AHRC) is currently a partner of the Cheltenham Festivals, and organises a set of public lectures and panel talks by AHRC-funded researchers  at each of the four festivals (jazz, music, literature, science) through the year.

Professor George McKay has worked with Cheltenham Jazz Festival and the AHRC to curate the series of talks at this year’s festival. There are three talks (information taken from festival website):

  • ‘Denys Baptiste: Struggle and Liberation.’ Saturday 3 May, 6-7 pm. The history of jazz is inseparable from the struggle for racial equality and Denys Baptiste’s suite Now is the Time…Let Freedom Ring captures this in music. He talks to leading British jazz academic Professor Tony Whyton about how he drew from Dr. Martin Luther King’s powerful speech.
  • ‘What makes a jazz legend?’ Sunday 4 May, 6.45-7.45 pm. What does it take for a jazz musician to become iconic? Professors McKay (AHRC Leadership Fellow) and Tony Whyton (Project Director, Rhythm Changes: Jazz Cultures and European Identities) discuss how musicians made jazz history — or got written out — from Winifred Atwell to John Coltrane.
  • ‘The story of British jazz festivals’. Monday 5 May, 5-6 pm. Professor McKay (AHRC Leadership Fellow) leads a panel of festival organisers and researchers, including the Festival’s Programme Advisor Tony Dudley-Evans, as they trace the memories and significance of Britain’s jazz festivals, from their riotous origins at Beaulieu Jazz Festival in 1956 to today’s diverse festival scene. Also features Alison Eales, AHRC-funded PhD student, who holds a Collaborative Doctoral Award between the University of Glasgow and Glasgow Jazz Festival.

Here, again, since we’re on the subject, is the film we made recently about AHRC-funded collaborations between jazz festivals and academic researchers…

Cheltenham Festivals landscape

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Carnivalising the Creative Economy

Mar 14 2014

This 15-minute film, entitled Carnivalising the Creative Economy, was funded by the AHRC and launched at the AHRC Creative Economy Showcase on 12 March 2014 at King’s Place, London.

Led by Professor George McKay, the film brings together academics and festivals directors from 5 recent / current AHRC-funded projects (including Rhythm Changes), who discuss the benefits and findings of such collaboration.

The film was made by Gemma Thorpe.

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New Jazz Conceptions: History, Theory, Practice: Saturday 31st May 2014

Mar 13 2014

New Jazz Conceptions: History, Theory, Practice

Saturday 31st May 2014

University of Warwick, UK

Poster (PDF Document) / Provisional Programme (PDF Document) / Booking Form (PDF Document) / Booking Form (Word Document)

Directions and Maps / B&B – on campus / B&B – off campus (Word Document)

In recent years jazz studies has attempted to move beyond the canonical view of jazz as a narrative of great performers within an American context, becoming more interdisciplinary and international in its approach. This one-day conference will bring together Warwick, Midlands and National speakers to discuss current research in jazz, share ideas about methodologies for future study, and explore the link between academics and the practice of jazz in the wider community.

Speakers: Tony WhytonCatherine TackleyAndrew HodgettsRoger MagrawKatherine Williams,Adrian LitvinoffSimon Barber and Vic Hobson (National Jazz Archive)

Abstracts

Organisers: Roger Fagge and Nicolas Pillai

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Transnational Studies in Jazz

Feb 04 2014

RoutledgeWe are delighted to announce the creation of a new monograph series with Routledge entitled ‘Transnational Studies in Jazz’. The series will present interdisciplinary and international perspectives on the relationship between jazz and its social, political, and cultural contexts, as well as providing authors with a platform for rethinking the methodologies and concepts used to analyse jazz’s musical meaning.

We therefore encourage proposals that challenge disciplinary boundaries, that find different ways of telling the story of jazz with or without reference to the United States, and that are sympathetic to jazz as a medium for negotiating global identities. This does not exclude artist biographies or close analysis of musical works, but rather, we ask that authors reconsider how they address their subjects and from what perspective they do so. Transnational Studies in Jazz explores the complex cultural and musical exchanges that have shaped the global development and reception of jazz.

We have launch publications planned for 2015 which include texts on jazz and advertising, post WWII jazz collectives, and the discourses of jazz, but we are now welcoming new proposals for monographs to appear in the series.

We would be delighted to discuss monograph proposals with you and hope you consider placing your work with this exciting new series.

We look forward to hearing from you soon!

Editors: Tony Whyton ([email protected]) & Nicholas Gebhardt ([email protected])

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