Call for Papers: 2020 conference, Amsterdam

Nov 07 2019 Published by under Conference, News

The seventh Rhythm Changes conference: Jazz Now! will take place at the Conservatorium van Amsterdam (Amsterdam University of the Arts), the Netherlands, from 27 to 30 August 2020. This conference marks the tenth anniversary of the Rhythm Changes project.

Keynote speaker

Lucas Dols (Sounds of Change Foundation)

Closing address

Prof. Charles Hersch (Cleveland State University)

Special plenary session

Rhythm Changes tenth anniversary panel

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We invite submissions for Jazz Now! a four-day multidisciplinary conference bringing together leading researchers across the arts and humanities. The event will feature academic papers, panels, roundtables, and poster sessions.

Jazz is often understood as an urgent music that responds to or addresses contemporary crises. Its history is inseparable from struggles over civil rights, racial and gender identities, cultural politics, social hierarchies, artistic significance, as well as new technologies. The music often defines itself through debates around inclusion and exclusion, as exemplified by iconic phrases such as ‘This Is Our Music’ (Ornette Coleman) or ‘What Jazz Is, and Isn’t…’ (Wynton Marsalis). The sounds of jazz have often been heard as strident, edgy, unexpected, demandingly presentist – as urgent. Jazz Now! seeks to critically explore how this sense of urgency plays out in jazz and how it contributes to our most compelling contemporary debates, and social and cultural change. 

We welcome papers addressing the conference theme from multiple perspectives, including cultural studies, musicology, cultural theory, music analysis, jazz history, media studies, and practice-based research. Within the general theme of Jazz Now! we have identified several sub-themes. Where relevant, please clearly identify which sub-theme you are referring to in your proposal.

Environment and sustainability

Circularity, sustainability, no-waste festivals, ‘climate songs’, Musicians for Future, the ClimateMusic project: this theme explores ways in which climate emergency and environmental debates might shape the production, dissemination, and experience of jazz. In which ways do current jazz practices pose short and long-term threats to the environment? (How) can we think of jazz practices in order to make them more ecologically sustainable? We invite papers focusing on the ways in which artists, critics, audiences, and producers respond to current climate debates.

Decolonisation

Museums, galleries, even our universities, have been at the forefront of interrogating their own pasts, digging into their foundations, archives and collections to uncover uncomfortable, hidden narratives of complicity. Could or should jazz, as an urgent and/or heritage music of the Black Atlantic forged in the experience of the transatlantic slave trade, have been helping to lead such debates? In what ways has jazz, including its studies and institutions, involved itself in the decolonisation of cultural practice and consumption, and are they adequate? 

Jazz Now?

Jazz as studied today is successful: it flourishes in academia, where researchers produce a constant stream of publications, and it flourishes in music education, where students are admitted after competitive entrance exams. Nevertheless, the student numbers both in academic programmes and vocational programmes seem out of balance with the marketplace. Does that affect the relevance of these programmes? What does it mean to be a jazz performer in relation to the major debates of our time? Has jazz education a responsibility in light of such issues? 

Populism

This theme explores ways in which jazz may participate in contemporary debates about populism and political futures. Through its familiarity and flexibility, jazz claims to be capable of embodying the peripheral and the partisan, the national and the cosmopolitan. We invite papers that explore issues of music and populism, the relation of jazz to democracy, struggles over the people versus ‘the elites’, and the potential for jazz performers and enthusiasts to engage with new forms of activism and social movements.

Jazz Now, and then

Jazz is a global musical form with a complex history of more thanahundred years. As an innovative and improvisatory style of music, not least due to hybridization with other musical traditions, it has become a major form of cultural expression with changing soundscapes. Connected to various social and political movements, naturally, also the meanings, perceptions and reception of jazz have been changing as well. This theme addresses jazz from different historical positions, from different perspectives and fields in past and present to explore possible meanings of jazz now. Or, is jazz now an inherently ahistorical position, a celebration of the improvisatory moment? 

Further information

Please submit proposals (max. 250 words), including a short biography (max. 50 words) and institutional affiliation, as a Word document to Loes Rusch and Walter van de Leur, conference directors, at rhythmchanges@ahk.nl.

The deadline for proposals is 1 February 2020; outcomes will be communicated to authors by mid-March 2020. All paper submissions will be considered by the conference committee, consisting of Loes Rusch and Walter van de Leur (Chairs), Christa Bruckner-Haring (KUG), Nicholas Gebhardt (BCU), George McKay (UEA), Catherine Tackley (Liverpool), Sarah Raine (BCU), and Tony Whyton (BCU).

Jazz Now! continues to build on the legacy of the research project Rhythm Changes: Jazz Cultures and European Identities (2010–2013), which was funded as part of the Humanities in the European Research Area (HERA) Joint Research Programme. In the spirit of Rhythm Changes, the project team continues to develop networking opportunities and champion collaborative research in transnational jazz studies.

Updates on the conference and information about travel and accommodation will be available here on the Rhythm Changes website and on the Rhythm Changes Facebook page. 

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Rhythm Changes Conference 2019 Graz

Jun 11 2018 Published by under Conference, News

The Sixth Rhythm Changes Conference: Jazz Journeys will take place at the University of Music and Performing Arts Graz in Austria from 11 to 14 April 2019.

Keynote Speakers

Prof. Jason Stanyek (University of Oxford)

Prof. Marie Buscatto (University of Paris 1 Panthéon Sorbonne)

Closing Address

Prof. Alan Stanbridge (University of Toronto)

We invite paper submissions for Jazz Journeys, a four-day multidisciplinary conference bringing together leading researchers across the arts and humanities. The event will feature academic papers, panels, roundtables, and poster sessions, as well as an exciting programme of performances by students and staff of the Jazz Institute of the University of Music and Performing Arts Graz.

Jazz has typically been the music of journeys and mobility. Its history is inseparable from global patterns of migration and changing demographics, as well as new forms of media communication and cultural production. The music speaks as much to dreams of escape as it does to the desire to put down roots; it continually seeks new pathways to meaning, even as it reinforces old boundaries. Jazz Journeys seeks to critically explore how ideas of mobility, movement, travel, exchange, voyaging, border-crossing and odyssey have shaped – and continue to shape – debates about the music’s past and future. We welcome papers addressing the conference theme from multiple perspectives, including cultural studies, musicology, cultural theory, music analysis, jazz history, media studies, and practice-based research. Within the general theme of Jazz Journeys, we have identified several sub-themes. Please clearly identify which theme you are referring to in your proposal.

 

Journeys — Mobility and Travels

This theme addresses hemispheric or global cultural movements in jazz, from the legacies of transatlantic slavery to the emergence of jazz communities throughout the world. We invite papers that engage with the different kinds of journeys that musicians undertake, from stylistic development to their involvement in the processes of migration and mobility, cross-cultural exchange, colonialism, and empire(s).

Journeys — Journées

This theme explores jazz as a companion to everyday life in private and public spaces, in the light of changing modes of interaction with the music. Are new technologies and platforms such as Spotify and Facebook changing the way we deal with jazz? How does jazz feature as a soundtrack to our ordinary existence? How do such regular interactions (or the avoidance of such interactions) reveal ideas about the meaning and value of jazz?

Journeys — Journal — Diary: History, Narrative, (Auto)biography

This theme explores the ways in which the experience of music is captured and the story of jazz told, from dominant narratives to (auto)biographies, popular tales to hidden histories. We welcome papers that interrogate dominant forms of causal and linear narration and engage with the ways in which the stories of jazz are written, adapted and changed through time. The theme seeks to engage with the underlying values that shape understandings of jazz and influenced what is celebrated and what ignored.

Journeys — Journals — Research

Fifty years ago, the founding of Jazzforschung / Jazz Research and Beiträge zur Jazzforschung / Studies in Jazz Research in Graz positioned jazz studies as an important area of musicology and related disciplines. We invite papers that explore the gaps, limitations and tensions in our understanding of jazz research, as well as new directions in the field.

Journeys — Journalism, Media and Technologies

This theme investigates the role of writing, mediatisation and technological change in the production, dissemination, and experience of jazz. We invite papers focusing on the ways in which ideas, sounds and images about the music circulate globally between artists, critics, audiences, and producers.

Journeys — Time(s) and Temporalities

This theme explores concepts of time and temporality in jazz, from the uses of multiple tempos and time signatures to theories and practices of repetition and revision. We invite papers that respond to the different times, temporalities, tempos, moments, instances, junctures, speeds, passages, and movements in and out of time that characterise jazz history and its practices.

Journeys — The Seductions of Alliteration

This theme addresses the many journeys in language, sound, gesture, and image that shape our understanding of jazz, including spontaneous writing, creative writing from the Harlem Renaissance, and Beat literature. We welcome papers that experiment with how to get from A to B, that sound out new ways of speaking of and thinking about jazz, and envision new practices and processes of writing about, and performing with, the music.

 

Please submit proposals (max. 250 words), including a short biography (max. 50 words) and institutional affiliation, as a Word document to Christa Bruckner-Haring at rhythmchanges@kug.ac.at.

The deadline for proposals is 15 September 2018; outcomes will be communicated to authors by 15 October 2018. All paper submissions will be considered by the conference committee, consisting of Christa Bruckner-Haring (Chair), André Doehring, Nicholas Gebhardt, George McKay, Loes Rusch, Walter van de Leur and Tony Whyton.

Jazz Journeys continues to build on the legacy of the research project Rhythm Changes: Jazz Cultures and European Identities (2010–2013), which was funded as part of the Humanities in the European Research Area (HERA) Joint Research Programme. In the spirit of Rhythm Changes, the project team continues to develop networking opportunities and champion collaborative research in transnational jazz studies.

Updates on the conference and information about travel and accommodation will be available on this website and https://www.facebook.com/jazzresearch/.

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Rhythm Changes Conference

Oct 31 2016 Published by under Conference, News

conference_logo4

The fifth international Rhythm Changes Conference a??Re/Sounding Jazza?? will take place at the

Conservatory of Amsterdam,

Oosterdokskade 151, Amsterdam,

from 31 August to 3 September 2017

Registration is open

Click here to register.

 

Click here for our recommended hotels

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Rhythm Changes Amsterdam 2017 conference

Oct 03 2016 Published by under Conference, News

rc-team-amsterdam-sept-2016The organising committee met at Amsterdam Conservatory in late September 2016 to reflect on the Birmingham conference at Easter, and to discuss the theme and call for papers for our 2017 conference…. Announcement imminent, but do note the 2017 dates below! The committee consists of (L-R in photo) Dr Loes Rusch (BCU), Dr Christa-Bruckner-Haring (Graz), Prof Tony Whyton (BCU), Prof Nick Gebhardt (BCU), Prof Walter van de Leur (Amsterdam) and ace photographerA?Prof George McKay (UEA).

rc-conferences-up-to-2017

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One LP Project exhibition by William Ellis

May 26 2016 Published by under Conference, Exhibition

You may have had the opportunity to view the One LP Project exhibition by William Ellis at the conference, consisting large portraits in the atrium area and a series of photographs adjacent to the lecture theatre.

 

One LP is a unique and critically acclaimed portraiture photography project that explores the inspirational qualities of music recordings and the impact that they have on people’s lives. It consists a portrait of an artist with a favourite recording. Each photograph is accompanied by a short interview that explores the meaning and value to the subject.

 

The One LP project is offered as a bespoke art event consisting of a pop up exhibition with seminar/workshop options.The presentation concept has been developed to appeal to arts, music, literary organisations and educational settings.

 

The flexibility of its presentation modes means that an event can be tailored to your programme, either as a stand-alone or as an integrated activity.

 

More details – http://onelp.org/the-one-lp-experience , http://www.europejazz.net/articles/one-lp-project

To enquire contact William Ellis – w@william-ellis.com

Images from William’s extensive jazz portfolio –http://william-ellis.com/

 

“One LP is a marvellous idea, superbly executed. The range of subjects (human and musical) is wide indeed, often surprising, sometimes touching, always interesting. May it go on and on!”

Dan Morgenstern, Director Emeritus, Rutgers – Institute of Jazz Studies, NEA Jazz Master.

 

This photo is Copyright A? William Ellis. All rights reserved.

This photo is Copyright William Ellis. All rights reserved.

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